Lab5 Forge API Intro – Get Properties & Search

(This is a continuation from the previous post: Lab4 “Forge API Web Intro JS”)

This post was prompted by an inquiry about accessing properties of Revit model using Forge API. He left a comment saying that he followed my tutorial and was able to view the uploaded model successfully. So let’s take Forge API Intro Lab4 as a starting point and build on top of it. In this post, we are going to add two functionalities that allow you to:

  • Select an object and obtain its properties
  • Search the model for a given string and isolate them in the viewer

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Lab4 Forge API Web Intro JS

(This is a continuation from the previous post: Lab3 “Forge API Web Intro”)

Now that we have a model uploaded to our bucket and translated for viewing, the final piece of functionality that we want to add is an ability to view the uploaded model in a html page. To do this, Forge API provides a client side JavaScript API.

In this lab, we make a basic viewer, which is based on Basic Viewer Step-by-Step Tutorial and is slightly modified to put it in the context of our lab and make it easier to built on top of what we have built in the previous lab.

Continue reading “Lab4 Forge API Web Intro JS”

Lab3 Forge API Web Intro

(This is a continuation from the previous post: Lab2 “Forge API Intro”)

In the previous lab, we wrote a desktop client application that creates your own custom storage in the cloud, uploads a file to that storage, and translates it for viewing. Those core functions that we wrote to make REST calls can be easily included in your authoring tools, such as Revit and AutoCAD. Next, we write a simple ASP.NET web application. For now, we keep the basic functionality same as Lab2 (i.e., authenticate, create a bucket, upload a file, and translate). Later in the Lab4, we will add JavaScript layer to embed a viewer.

The good news is that we have written the functions to make the Forge web services REST calls in a way that we can simply reuse them. In the sample project, we put the common Forge REST calls under Forge folder. You can simply copy the folder to your web application if you have followed the labs 1 and 2.

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